CATEGORY / Clayton

AUTUMN – GLAZING VIEWING CRITERIA

As we move again towards the colder shorter days, and low light of Autumn we’re reminded of the seasonal glass issues that this time of year can bring for installers. Last Autumn we published some guidelines on external condensation, we hope you found this useful and its posted again here as a reminder.

This year I’d briefly like to look at the effect of the morning and evening sun, its temporary effect on the visuals of installed glass and thus the importance of glass manufacturer, installer and customer all operating to the same standardised inspection criteria.

This really struck me whilst driving home in bright Autumn sun, through a tree lined street last week. I became suddenly aware that the sky was teaming with thousands, millions of particles – it literally looked like the attack of the midgies. Tiny flies, grains of dust, and pollen were shining like millions of little lights in front of me and for a second it was a bit alarming, as if an insects nest had been disturbed and they were swarming all over.

Suddenly the sun went behind a tree and it all disappeared, instantly.  When the bright and direct light disappeared, so did the flies. Or actually they didn’t –  it just dawned on me that they are always there, it’s just only under extreme lighting conditions could they be seen so vividly.

This incident brought to mind the problems that can be associated with glass units, when viewed in extreme light.

It’s the time of year where we are getting a few instances each week where we are being asked for replacements due to marks in cavity, from installations many months previous. The home owner was assumedly happy with their glass and windows for several months, but on certain days, at certain times of year and from certain angles small marks, streaks or other visual effects are apparent.

The Glass & Glazing Federation inspection criteria to which we adhere says of viewing conditions:

 ‘Do so in natural daylight, but not directly towards the sun and with no visible moisture on the surface of the glass’

Ignoring these instructions and viewing in direct sunlight, and especially at an oblique angle to the glass, will almost certainly result in otherwise invisible visual effects being noticeable, such as:

  • A bloom or haze illuminating the cavity (This is the low E surface catching the light)
  • Milky or dusty appearance
  • The accentuation of small scratches and particles

Just a reminder therefore to encourage all staff and customers to be aware of and to follow these instructions when considering whether a unit should be replaced not. We often offer site visits but are told only to come at certain times of the day when the sun is round – this should always ring alarm bells.

  • View in daylight but not direct sunlight
  • View at right-angles to the glass, from 2 metres
  • Look through not at the glass

If these instructions are not followed properly, then almost certainly both installer and IGU supplier are going to spend time and money which could be avoided with the right understanding of inspection criteria.

http://www.ggf.org.uk/publication/quality_of_vision_double_glazing

SILICONE CONTAMINATION ON SELF CLEANING GLASS

99% of installations of true self cleaning glass are problem free. However, have you installed any self cleaning glass that isn’t working as expect?

The self clean coating is produced on state of the art coating plants, and rarely is the source of any issue. More likely are external factors, such as contamination on the face of the glass, stopping it working. This can be many causes, from tree sap, to heavy dust or silicone (during the installation process).

Below is a useful video, illustrating the affect on the glass when the external face has been contaminated with silicone. The glass no longer ‘sheets’ but forms ‘beads’. This is one of the most common causes of issues with installations incorporating self cleaning glass.

If you require any further advise, please contact one of our team on 01207 288200.

 

 

SMALL ORDER DELIVERY SURCHARGE

Despite the performance of our glass roof and other products continually increasing, for several years now we have been seeing falling order values in our markets be it through net shaped pricing, overall size or headline metre square rates. We understand this – it’s just business and like everyone else in the fenestration industry we remain focused on improving the value to our customer, controlling costs and helping you to differentiate your business with our class leading products such as Ultra 86.

Recently however we’re seeing a specific shift in the glass roof market, with hybrid, lantern and other systems joining the glass mix we process and deliver nationwide as part of our SMARTGLASS offering. Whilst these less traditional product lines are undoubtedly sales opportunities, they’re also highly challenging as we see a whole new product stream of small glass orders making up an increasing part of our busy daily delivery commitments.

These smaller orders usually have exactly the same demands in terms of lead time, geography, site locations etc, but they just tend to attract less sales value per delivery drop. Given our logistic costs are more or less fixed per drop as opposed to value of that drop, the net result is a huge imbalance in delivery cost vs delivered value.

We need to address both overall and on an order by order basis to remain a sustainable and important part of the supply chain for these low glass content installations.

We trust you will understand that delivering a one off chargeable unit or a small order to any UK postcode without fixed contribution to the cost of getting it there is simply not viable, and will work with us in maintaining our element of the supply chain to everyone’s benefit.  There are of course opportunities to fulfil these orders and avoid the unnecessary costs for all parties and this would remain our first option.

Advance, delay or combine a delivery, order side wall glass to accompany the roof glass, or even collect. We remain on hand to offer advice in combining delivery days etc and how to ‘play the system’ to minimise any impact, but we reluctantly advise orders placed from August 7th we will be implementing a delivery surcharge of £60 for all orders under £250 in attempt to make these sales viable to us.

Thank you in advance for your continued support.

A link to this document, for onward circulation as necessary.

Small Order Surcharge July 17

UPDATE: NEW KEY CONTACT DETAILS

It’s a key part of our offering that our customers have full and direct access to our management team and the various functions and departments.

As such we’ve updated our key contacts list and phone numbers, please take the time to download our key contacts list and distribute to the people who may find this of relevance in your business.

CLAYTON SUCCESS IN THE NATIONAL FENESTRATION AWARDS

We’re delighted to announce that for the second year running we’ve won our category and been awarded IGU Manufacturer of the Year for 2016

Especially pleasing is that NFAs remains one award where categorically industry votes and votes alone determine which business are successful, so a huge thanks to all of our hugely valued customers and industry peers who voted for us.

Needless to say this award will only drive us further in pushing industry boundaries in what can be achieved at Clayton Glass. With more investment and a game changing roof glass set to launch next year. you can rest assured that’s what the team here will be focused on.

Thanks !

CLAYTON GLASS ACQUIRE ROMAG

Two of the North East’s leading glass and glazing companies today came under the same ownership as today we acquired Romag, one of the UK’s most well recognised and longstanding glass processors, albeit in a completely different arena to Clayton Glass.

Established over 70 years ago, Romag operates in the high security glazing and transport industries, with clients such as Bombardier and Hitachi in the rail sector. Recent years saw the company expand into the Solar PV market, although with that sector being compromised by the end of the feed in tariff and cheaper imports, the renewed focus is in specialism bespoke PV solutions.

Although there are many synergies between the two companies in terms of location, history and core glass manufacturing activities, they specialise in very different areas of the glass industry and hence we will continue to operate each company completely independently so that both can focus entirely on continuing to grow their specialist market share.

Whilst this represents  huge opportunity for the wider group, from a Clayton Glass customer perspective there will be no changes, other than perhaps a faster turnaround, on processing, drilling, painted glass etc, all of which have previously been bought externally but will now be sourced in house.

Our medium term aim at Clayton remains to continue our drive on quality, service, and delivery times all of which have shown large improvements since the move to Harelew, but particularly over the past few weeks.  A renewed focus with the customer service team in terms of response to queries and the flow of information is also underway.

We hope that with this acquisition there will be many synergies for both companies to the benefit of all of our joint customers.

CLAYTON GLASS RECOGNISED BY STOCK EXCHANGE

Another accolade has headed our way this week – and even better as this time it was totally out of the blue. We’ve been recognised as one of the top ‘1000 companies that inspire Britain’, an annual celebration of the fastest growing and most dynamic SMEs.

The award is given to recognise sustained sales growth – the criteria being significant growth over at least a 4 year period and having out performed their industry peers in that time.

Here at Clayton Glass we all know that we’re growing our loyal customer base month on month,  year after year –  we just didn’t know anyone else was watching, especially not the London Stock Exchange !

A huge thanks to all of our customer for your ongoing support.

http://www.lseg.com/resources/1000-companies-inspire-brit

loading
×